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Posts Tagged ‘Umar Haque

Jihadist Umar Haque taught Genocide at Islamic School.

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There is immense sadness, and anger, after the conviction of Umar Haque and his associates, Abuthather Mamun, Muhammad Abid, and Nadeem Patel (‘I’ News)

The Independent chose the right words in saying, “Isis fanatic tried to recruit children for ‘death squad‘ to launch terror attacks in London.”

The ‘self-radicalised’ supporter of ISIS has been found guilty of preparing “children for martyrdom by making them roleplay terrorist attacks in London.”

He was able to do this at the Lantern of Knowledge Islamic school and the Ripple Road Mosque.

That Hacque’s activities went unnoticed by those in charge of these institutions, “staggers belief” as a former Policeman said on RT yesterday.

Deash, the Islamic State, and its adherents have committed genocide – against Yazidis (Genocide of Yazidis by ISIL), Christians, and Shiite Muslims (ISIS Is Committing Genocide. Huff Post).

Haque wanted to recruit for their genocidal racist Einsatsgruppen.

Were the preparations for murder carried out by those now convicted the work of the far-right, the entire liberal and left wing media would be boiling.

As it is most people are no doubt still numb.

Clearly Hacque’s systematic activities, helped by other, indicate that his ‘radicalisation’, was not a momentary or nihilistic coup de tête”.

He was able to ‘teach’ in Muslim institutions.

This is perhaps the first issue to look at, as the National Secular Society indicates today.

What of institutions like this school and the Mosque which have permitted these ideas to be broadcast?

There remain many more questions, not just about faith education, but about the fight against the genociders of Daesh and other jihadists.

On the ground, they have been fought back, with a key role played in Syria by the brave sisters and brothers of the Kurdish fighting units of the YPG.

But few are confident that support for their ideology has disappeared.

Lax home schooling laws exploited by extremists

 A half of 70 known extremists in London removed their children from state schools to educate them at home, according to Metropolitan Police study.

Details of the study into 70 extremists and their children emerged following Friday’s conviction of an unqualified teacher, Umar Haque, for plotting up to 30 terrorist attacks in London, reports the Sunday Times.

As previously reported by the NSS, Umar Haque brainwashed young boys attending the Ripple Road mosque in Barking, and made them carry out role-playing sessions where some took the part of police officers and others were jihadists. In one exercise they used imaginary knives to sever a head. Haque also taught at a private Islamic school in Leyton called Lantern of Knowledge.

The Met Police study appears to back up a previous warning from Neil Basu, deputy assistant commissioner of the Metropolitan police, that “segregated, isolated communities, unregulated education and home schooling are a breeding ground for future terrorists”.

Pressure is growing on the government to tighten lax home education laws after campaigners, including the NSS, have warned that they are being exploited by religious communities to educate their children in unregistered schools. Illegal schools have been found in Birmingham, Luton and a number of London boroughs. Some have links to extremist organisations, and many have almost no secular or English education. There is also evidence of children being exposed to hate-filled homophobic and misogynistic teaching material in them.

The NSS is supporting a new private member’s bill to safeguard children’s rights by better regulating home schooling. The Home Education (Duty of Local Authorities) Bill, moved by NSS honorary associate Lord Soley, would institute a duty for local authorities to monitor the educational, physical and emotional development of children receiving home education in England and Wales, and for a parent to register home-educated children with the local authority. It is due to be debated next month.

The NSS is also calling on the government to better regulate out of school educational settings, such as madrassas and yeshivas, that provide “intensive tuition, instruction or training” where children attend over six hours per week.

A government proposal for a system of registration and inspection of supplementary schools was recently shelved following opposition from the Church of England, which feared the registration of its Sunday schools, despite the fact they would be largely unaffected by the proposals.

At least 350 unregistered schools have been set up across Britain, according to Ofsted, which is calling for strengthened powers to tackle them. Warning notices have been issued to 50 suspected unregistered schools, 38 have closed or ceased to operate illegally and 12 are under criminal investigation. So far no proprietors of illegal schools have been prosecuted.

Robert Halfon MP, chair of the Commons education committee, has said there should be no ‘grey areas’ and is worried about the lack of regulation concerning unregistered schools.

Stephen Evans, National Secular Society chief executive, said: “After years of campaigning, we are finally seeing wide recognition that it is completely unacceptable for British children to be left to languish in unregistered settings where they are indoctrinated by fundamentalists and left exposed to harm.

“There is a balance to be struck between the rights of parents to home educate and the rights of the child to a proper education. But that balance must be struck in order to protect child rights.

“The denial of secular education and the teaching of intolerance and violence in unregistered schools has the clear potential to damage to the minds of young people and cause harm to wider society. The government can no longer look the other way.”

Background: the Guardian reported on Saturday,

Isis follower tried to create jihadist child army in east London

Umar Haque, 25, taught an Islamic studies class despite having no teaching qualifications and being employed as an administrator. He was allowed to supervise classes of 11- to 14-year-olds on his own, during which he re-enacted attacks on police officers and showed students videos of beheadings.

Police fear Haque attempted to radicalise at least 110 children, some of whom he was in contact with at the Ripple Road mosque in Barking, east London. Thirty-five of the children are receiving long-term support.

Haque also worked at the £3,000-a-year Lantern of Knowledge Islamic school, where he was again allowed access to children alone under the pretence of teaching Islamic studies when he was in fact employed as an administrator.


Haque was convicted by a jury at the Old Bailey on Friday of a number of offences, including plotting terrorist attacks. He had previously admitted four charges of collecting information useful for terrorism and one count of disseminating a terrorist document in relation to his attempts to radicalise children at the mosque. He was acquitted of conspiring to possess firearms.

Two other men, Abuthaher Mamun, 19, and Muhammad Abid, 27, were convicted for their roles in helping him. A fourth defendant, Nadeem Patel, 26, who had previously pleaded guilty to possessing a handgun, was acquitted of plotting with Haque.


The schools watchdog, Ofsted, faces questions over how it was able to rate the Lantern of Knowledge school as outstanding after an inspection held at a time when Haque was allegedly preaching hate to the children.

The Charity Commission confirmed on Friday that it has opened a statutory inquiry into the Lantern of Knowledge Educational Trust. The commission is also investigating the Ripple Road mosque.


His plan was to build an army of children,” said Commander Dean Haydon, the head of counter-terrorism at Scotland Yard. “He had shown them graphic terrorist videos of barbarity, beheading videos and serious injuries mostly in terrorist attacks overseas.

“He had instructed children not to say anything in relation to not telling their teachers or their parents. We had a wall of silence.

“He tried to prepare the children for martyrdom by making them roleplay terrorist attacks in London. Part of that re-enactment including attacking police officers.”


He was also involved in running evening classes in a madrasa based in a large marquee attached to the mosque in Ripple Road in late 2016 and early 2017.

He told the boys, aged about 12 to 14, that he had established contact with Isis and showed them a series of videos projected on to the wall inside the marquee, ensuring the doors were closed.

The images included blood, wounds and people falling from buildings. One film showed the exhumation of a boy. Haque told the children the child’s body had deteriorated because he had been beaten after death when he was unable to answer questions put to him by angels.

He also had the children in the madrasa doing push-ups, races and grappling with each other in order to train them.

There were sessions of role-playing during which the children would be divided into police and attackers, and there were demonstrations of how to sever a head. After the Westminster Bridge attack by Khalid Masood last March, Haque used the atrocity as inspiration for the roleplays.

He said he intended to teach the children to drive as they got older so he could carry out attacks across London. He forced them take an oath not to tell their parents, friends or teachers, and it is claimed he aimed to recruit 300 jihadists.

The 35 children in long-term support were “paralysed in fear” by Haque, Haydon said. “He threatened them if they were to talk. It doesn’t appear that any of those children raised the alarm.”

Six children gave evidence in court. The trial was shown video of a police interview with a child, who said: “He is teaching us terrorism, like how to fight.”

The boy said: “He has been training us, kind of. Apparently fighting is good. If you fight for the sake of Allah, on judgment day when you get judged for your good deeds and bad deeds, fighting is good.”

Ofsted inspectors visited the Lantern of Knowledge school in November 2015, two months after Haque started working there. In their report, they said: “The strong sense of community, harmony and respect within the school reflects the school ethos and aims of leaders and governors to develop well-rounded citizens.

“The spiritual, moral, social and cultural development of pupils is outstanding. They have an excellent understanding of the world around them and make a positive contribution to their community.”


Written by Andrew Coates

March 4, 2018 at 12:36 pm