Tendance Coatesy

Left Socialist Blog

Posts Tagged ‘Alt-Right

Alt-Right Ipswich Tory MP Tom Hunt Warns Woke Culture out to “undermine social cohesion and local pride.”

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Baying Mob of Woke Statue Topplers (National Treasure Brendan O’Neill Cast into the Brink).

 

Alt Right Ipswich MP (KNOB, Knight Noble of Britishness) writes in Nigel Farage’s favourite paper, the Express,

History of our nation must not be rewritten by baying mob of woke statue-topplers

Tom Hunt. Express.

WOKE culture seems to have become an invitation for some of our institutions to undermine social cohesion and local pride. Historic England is the latest prominent example of a once trusted body waging war against our heritage, and in particular our villages.

Villages be Warned!

They have compiled a list of sites across the country which have links to people involved in the transatlantic slave trade. With this list, Historic England has named village halls, farms, schools and parish churches going out of their way to establish even tenuous links with the transatlantic slave trade. This has included chapels where historical figures worshipped and were buried. The sites can house the graves of those who profited directly from slavery, but also their relatives.

Sacred Places!

this view is used by those who seek to denigrate our cultural heritage and vandalise our shared sacred places.

He continues,

For many, it feels Maoist and dystopian. A quiet cultural revolution administered from the top rungs of the institutions which have been tasked with the great duty of preserving our culture and beautiful buildings for centuries to come.

Great Pyramids.

Obviously, the transatlantic slave trade was a moral blight.

But it was by no means exceptional.

For thousands of years prior, slaves and serfs had been used to build great works throughout the world, from the pyramids of Giza, to the Taj Mahal, to many of the ancient Cathedrals of England which were funded by repressive regimes of serfdom. Britain was the first nation in history to confront the horrors of the global slave trade in which some of her citizens were involved.

He concludes,

It is right to condemn slavery as a great sin, but it is the wrong approach to go about auditing our towns and villages to shame people into a sense of guilt about the places in which they grew up and the buildings which have brought their communities together.

 

Our gumshoes are now tracing out the links between Hunt and his fellow alt-Right anti-Wokeists.

Expect Revelations!

 

 

Written by Andrew Coates

February 14, 2021 at 3:36 pm

Trump to Designate ‘Antifa’ a “Terrorist Organisation”. What *is* Antifa?

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Image

Radical Left Rejects Trumps Wild Claims.

 

There are claims that the “radical left” is behind the unrest in the USA.

This has been the headline grabbing announcement.

The claims have got stronger as the day dawns.

They’ve already got around the world.

The New York Times reports just now,

Amid a rush to assign blame for violence and vandalism, accusations that extremists or outside agitators were behind the destruction ricocheted online and on the airwaves.

But,

“..few of those pointing the finger at extremists presented much detailed evidence to support the accusations, and some officials conceded the lack of solid information.”

The NYT continues in this sceptical vein.

The point is best made here:

 

Spencer Sunshine is a highly respected activist and writer on the far right, with direct experience in the United States of confronting the alt-right, in its various radical forms.

Last year he wrote, after an earlier manufactured panic, the following article,

Antifa Panic

The United States is having its third wave of “Antifa panic” in as many years. Donald Trump’s 27 July tweet called for Antifa—short for antifascist activists—to be declared “a major Organization of Terror”.

Antifa is not an organisation at all, but a decentralised, leaderless movement that opposes fascism and the far-right. Although most of its work is legal and non-violent, the movement is best known for occasional street fights with extremists.

Recently in the US, Antifa has become a bogeyman among conservatives, like 1950s anti-Communism.

Numerous conspiracy theories have moved into the conservative mainstream and today Trump repeats propaganda that, until recently, could be only heard among neo-Nazis.

Spencer Sunshine
 

Spencer made this point, which is about as farseeing as you could possibly get:

These conspiracy theories include claims that Antifa was going to start a civil war; caused a train derailmentdesecrate graves, and inspired a mass shooter.

Antifa panic points out the European origins of the movement, outlines the development of the far-right, from the French nouvelle droite, identitarianism, and the way the groups were inspired by the German militant activists began by forming “crews” (as in the English expression) to fight Nazis at punk rock gigs in the 1980s.

In this millennium.

The new wave of Antifa was catalysed by a 20 January 2017 protest at Trump’s inaugural rally in Washington, DC.

Here, the traditional left-wing inauguration protest included a black bloc—a normal occurrence, comparable to European May Day rallies. But the black bloc was branded as “Antifa.”

Nearby, Alt-Right leader Richard Spencer was punched on camera, and the video went viral.

During this time, the Alt-Right turned from an internet phenomenon to a force capable of large street mobilisations. A series of clashes between far-right and radical left protestors kicked off around the country.

This continued through August 2017, when a fascist-led rally in Charlottesville, Virginia ended with a car attack on an Antifa march.

Antifa’s reputation has bounced up and down in the press. Praise after the inauguration protest was followed by disparagement, and post-Charlottesville adoration was followed by condemnation.

The current wave is the third round of mainstream attacks on Antifa.

Perhaps the most significant aspect of the piece is the distinction between antifa and the Black Bloc.

This is important and illustrates the deliberate confusion between the two manufactured by Trump and his allies.

Yesterday this Blog posted on the strategies of the groups inspired by Lundi Matin, and their celebration of the violent “casseurs” during Gilets Jaunes marches. We suggested that some ‘autonomists may see in US violent protests, even pillaging, parallel revolutionary efforts.

It is equally the case that French anti-fascists, many of whom were amongst the first to point to the dubious tolerance by the Gilets Jaunes of far rightists and the equally tolerant stand of some of the present day followers of L’insurrection qui vient and conspiracy-mongering red-browners , make the same distinction.

Anifa is about being against the far right, not indulging in violent dreams of creating autonomous spaces that prefigure a revolution. 

Antifa, this US video points out, is not the Black Bloc.

The NYT also brings up the issue of far-right involvement,

 

Members of hate groups or far-right organizations filmed themselves, sometimes heavily armed or waving extremist symbols, at demonstrations in at least 20 cities in recent days, from Boston to Buffalo to Richmond, Va., to Dallas to Salem, Ore.

A common nickname for their anticipated second Civil War is the “boogaloo,” which sometimes gets mutated into the “Big Igloo” or the “Big Luau,” prompting its adherents to wear Hawaiian shirts. Many of them use Facebook to organize despite the company’s May 1 announcement that it would remove such content.

This Blog is no specialist on the US far right, but this does seem to resemble some of the lurid scenarios of their European counterparts. Guillaume Faye in particular his “, Why we Fight – manifesto of the European resistance (2011) and the (posthumous), Guerre civile raciale (2019) Faye was prone to predict wars between a variety of forces leading the great replacement’ and the indigenous Europeans. This “catastrophism” rather than the detail of Fayes prediction, seems to chime with the present alt-right mood.

Above all its the idea of creating “ethnospheres”, “groups of territories ruled by peoples who are ethnically related” that may be taking hold in these quarters. Faye is said to have had a real influence on the US far right (Key Thinkers of the Radical RightBehind the New Threat to Liberal Democracy. Edited by Mark Sedgwick. Oxford 2019).

The Red Brown Spiked site has already welcomed protests against lby the far-right Spanish Vox party:

Spain is in revolt against the lockdown

Over a million fines have been handed out against lockdown rule-breakers. This dissent is welcome.

 On 23 May, tens of thousands of people, in over 50 towns and city centres across Spain, took to their cars to protest at the PSOE / Unidas Podemos government’s handling of the corona crisis. Madrid, Barcelona, Cadiz, Cordoba, Malaga, Palma de Mallorca, Pamplona, Sevilla, Valladolid, Valencia, Zaragoza and others, which have been ghostly quiet for weeks, came momentarily back to life. The caravana protest was called by Vox, the right-wing populist party.

It will be interesting to see how UK red-brown supporters react to the US unrest, something about which Spiked is uncharacteristically quiet.

 

Written by Andrew Coates

June 1, 2020 at 10:33 am

The Great Replacement, Violent White Nationalism, from Christchurch to El Paso.

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Image result for the great replacement

Far-Right Call that Inspires Terrorism.

El Paso Massacre: Nihilism, Narcissism and White Nationalism

The alleged gunman is suspected of posting a 2,300-word manifesto titled “The Inconvenient Truth” moments before the attack. The manifesto referenced the Christchurch massacres in New Zealand that killed 51. According to the New York Times, the Christchurch mass murderer referenced:

“a white supremacist theory called ‘the great replacement.” The theory has been promoted by a French writer named Renaud Camus, and argues that elites in Europe have been working to replace white Europeans with immigrants from the Middle East and North Africa.” 

Psychology Today.Ravi Chandra

The Daily Beast perhaps has the best take on the influence of these ideas,

Kelly Weill: From El Paso to Christchurch, a Racist Lie Is Fueling Terrorist Attacks

Alleged killers in Christchurch, New ZealandPoway, California; and El Paso, Texas believed a theory that claims white people are being “replaced” by people of color through mass immigration. Conspiracy theorists often falsely claim this is a deliberate effort by any number of groups demonized on the far right: liberals, Democrats, Jews, Muslims. It’s the theory peddled by white supremacist groups seeking recruits and the torch-bearing marchers in Charlottesville two years ago. It’s also a thinly disguised—and often not disguised—talking point from some conservative politicians and pundits, experts say.

By leaving these conspiratorial manifestos, white supremacists are trying to add to a long and growing library of terror, and get others to follow their examples.

“They’re also trying to inspire others about the urgency of the moment. In particular with the New Zealand shooter, the Poway shooter, and this guy in El Paso, you see these ideas building on each other,” Heidi Beirich, director of the Southern Poverty Law Center’s Intelligence Project, told The Daily Beast.

“There’s no question these people are feeding off each other because they’re referencing prior manifestos. In the Poway case and the El Paso case, they both referenced Christchurch.”

..

In name alone, the conspiracy theory began in 2011, with the book The Great Replacement by French author Renaud Camus. The anti-Muslim, anti-immigrant text likened the growth of non-white populations to the genocide of white people in European countries. This supposed genocide is non-existent. White supremacists use it as an excuse for violence anyway.

On August 11, 2017, white supremacists led a torchlit march on the University of Virginia campus in Charlottesville, Virginia. The marchers chanted “you will not replace us,” or sometimes “Jews will not replace us,” in a callout to the conspiracy theory.

 

Here are reports on the alt-right web notice board involved.

Camus denies any connection with any killing.

In other word he denies any link.

 

He compares himself to a liberation movement and issues this call to arms.

France Inter disagrees, calling Camus’ writing a seminal text for the the radicalised young.

Le Grand Remplacement, texte séminal pour ces jeunes radicalisés

Many people have read Renaud Camus’ le grand remplacement, “ the great replacement” . Apart from the name, whose message takes two seconds to get, the book is short. Its appeal is that it is “a conspiracy theory that claims a global elite is conspiring against the European white populations to replace them with non-European peoples.”

In this simplicity Camus stands out from the intellectualised writings of people like Guillaume Faye (1949 – 2018), a key thinker in “identitarianism” and Alain de Benoist, a founder of the far-right Nouvelle Droite. Both are parents of the ‘alt-right’. Faye talked of “La Colonisation de l’Europe”  and ” ethnomasochism” by which Europeans denigrate their history faced with this ‘invasion’. Few people would follow with ease, however, the detailed pages in his writings on “L’Archéofuturisme“, beyond this rhetoric, “We are standing face to face with the barbarians. The enemy is no longer outside but inside the City, and the ruling ideology, paralysed, is incapable of spotting him. It stammers, overcome by its own moral disarmament, and is giving up: this is the time to seize the reins. Present society is an accomplice to the evil that is devouring it.”

Benoist’, who has written on nationalism, sovereignty, Nietzsche, Gramsci, the Indo-Europeans, neo-paganism (a theme he shares with Faye), Jesus, European Identity, and a  few more subjects, can be summed up in the belief that “European “identity” needs to be defended against erasure by immigration, global trade, multinational institutions, and left-wing multiculturalism.” (They Wanted To Be A Better Class Of White Nationalists. They Claimed This Man As Their Father J.Lester Feder and Pierre Buet).

Some of these ideas have fed into the left and have helped shaped the present-day ‘red-brown’ front.

The  ‘leftist’ intellectual US journal Telos translated Benoist’s Manifesto for a European Renaissance in 1999 and had a deep interest and sympathy for Faye. Some of the first renderings into English of the nouvelle droite current  were done by this one-time radical-chic publisher which counts Alain de Benoist as a regular contributor (Archeofuturism: European Visions of the Post-Catastrophic Age (Guillaume Faye).  More recently the criticism of ‘rootless cosmopolitans’ and behalf of the ‘somewhere’ people with deep ties to place and culture, a call taken up by supporters of the red-brown front the Full Brexit, and others, parallels Faye and Benoist’s right-wing identity politics with a new identity politics of the Brexit Party and pro-Brexit left. The ‘working class’ is seen is seen as a hereditary culture under threat from ‘globalism’ and its vehicle, the European Union. ‘Uncontrolled’ immigration is a common target. (1)

Yet the far-right goes much further, and raves at a ‘genocidal’ threat.

This is Guillaume Faye on the European Union, developing themes in the same vein as Camus (2016).

European peoples are surreptitiously victims of an attempt at genocide, demographic and cultural elimination, driven by their own ethno-masochistic and xenophile elites. This is an historical first.  The French authorities are, with the Belgians, the most involved in this enterprise of soft genocide. The is both physical and cultural.

Despite an apparent anti-racist ideology, it nevertheless follows a racial and racist goal: to eliminate from Europe, progressively, and in particular from France, the native populations. Eliminate them in five ways: by encouraging settlement immigration from outside Europe; discouraging native birth rates and penalizing middle-class families; by provoking the exile of young indigenous forces by dissuasive taxation measures; by favoring, in social, economic, legal and cultural terms, populations of non-European origin in relation to indigenous peoples; by penalizing and punishing all opposition to the global immigrationist project and any hindrance to its ideology.

A project of genocide of the European peoples? – by Guillaume Faye

On Camus I cannot recommend too highly this article: which should be read in full (extracts)

How Gay Icon Renaud Camus Became the Ideologue of White Supremacy

The bizarre odyssey of the “great replacement” theorist shows that kitsch can kill. James McAuley

A pioneering gay writer in the heady 1980s. A laureate of the Académie Française, a literary circle so rarefied that its members are known as les immortels. A radical champion of art for art’s sake who withdrew to a 14th-century château to live among the paintings and the pictures that were the only sources of meaning he ever seemed to recognize. These are all descriptions that might once have captured the essence of Renaud Camus.

His trademark was fearlessness, as evinced in his 1979 autobiographical novel, Tricks, which recounts in unsparing detail a string of nonchalant homosexual encounters the narrator has in nightclub bathrooms and grimy apartments on both sides of the Atlantic. “I put saliva in my ass, kneeled on both sides of him, and brought his penis, which was not of a very considerable size, inside me without much difficulty,” we read of one such encounter. “He came the moment one of my fingers was pressed inside the crack of his ass.” That was Camus then.

These days, the author of Tricks is better known as the principal architect of le grand remplacement (the great replacement), the conspiracy theory that white, Christian Europe is being invaded and destroyed by hordes of black and brown immigrants from North and sub-Saharan Africa. Since 2012, when it appeared as the title of a book Camus self-published, the term “great replacement” has become a rallying cry of white supremacists around the world—the demonstrators who stormed through Charlottesville, Virginia, in August 2017; the man who killed 11 worshippers at the Tree of Life synagogue in Pittsburgh in October 2018; and especially Brenton Tarrant, the suspect in the New Zealand mosque attacks in March. Tarrant posted his own “The Great Replacement”—a 74-page online manifesto—before murdering 51 people.

The day after the Christchurch shooting, I called Camus out of the blue, reporting for The Washington Post. He told me then that he condemned this kind of violence but that he ultimately appreciated the attention these episodes have brought to his arguments. Does he resent “the fact that people take notice of the ethnic substitution that is in progress in my country?” he asked rhetorically. “No. To the contrary.”

..

Who, after all, reads Renaud Camus in 2019? Not the literary critics who still study Céline and Pound. Camus’s target demographic is angry white men with no discernible culture or critical faculties who shoot up mosques and synagogues because it makes them feel superior. His work provides them with some kind of half-baked justification, based on the lie of le grand remplacement, which is indeed “the epitome of all that is spurious in the life of our times.”

Consider the following excerpt from “The Great Replacement,” the manifesto published online by Brenton Tarrant. He drew particular attention to his travels in France, the details of which have yet to be confirmed. “The final push was witnessing the state of French cities and towns. For many years I had been hearing and reading of the invasion of France by non-whites, many of these rumours and stories I believed to be exaggerations, created to push a political narrative. But once I arrived in France, I found the stories not only to be true, but profoundly understated.” Where had Tarrant been reading those stories? Perhaps Camus’s seminal achievement has been to show that kitsch can kill.