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Socialist Worker: After Brexit, Our Turn!

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Brexit Will Need Revolutionaries to re-read the Classics.

Tory splits provide the opportunity of a lifetime.

Says Socialist Worker in what must be the most inane headline since….

Well most of us are sick to the buck teeth with strained analogies with that them there ‘itler’s time….

Meanwhile the paper is beside itself with joy:

“Tories in meltdown” ran a headline in the Sunday Times newspaper last week. The story said, “As party unity crumbles, Boris Johnson may be back to seize Cameron’s job”.

The Tories are tearing themselves apart over the European Union (EU) referendum, with bitter rows every day.

The blood-spilling will continue right up until the vote on 23 June—and beyond.

This is the moment to step up the exit campaign from the left. It should oppose racism, the EU bosses’ club, the pro-corporation trade deals and stand for internationalism and workers’ unity.

The Remain camp has mobilised the forces that spectacularly plunged the world into recession in 2008 to say leaving the EU would spell economic disaster.

Last week Tory chancellor George Osborne said the Treasury had begun contingency planning to shore up Britain’s financial system should the Leave vote.

Socialist Worker.

What excatly will this opportunity provide?

The SWP’s paper says,

We need independent politics against the bosses on both sides.

Socialist Worker supports the Leave campaign from the left.

We don’t share platforms with the Tories or Ukip and we argue against those who say that migrants are a problem.

Er, that it: Sell Socialist Worker and join the SWP….

Meanwhile in the drab colourless world we, unlike the SWP, live in:

Priti Patel reveals Leave campaign agenda to reduce workers’ rights, says TUC.

 

Commenting on a speech today at the Institute of Directors by pro-Brexit MP Priti Patel, in which she argued that leaving the EU would be an opportunity to cut EU social and employment protections, TUC General Secretary Frances O’Grady said:

“Leave the EU and lose your rights at work – that’s the message that even Leave campaigners like Priti Patel are now giving.

“But which rights would go – your right to paid holidays, your right to parental leave, maybe protections for pregnant workers?

“The EU guarantees all these rights and more, and it’s why Brexit is such a big risk for working people.”

NOTES TO EDITORS:

– In her speech today, Priti Patel said: “If we could just halve the burdens of the EU social and employment legislation we could deliver a £4.3 billion boost to our economy and 60,000 new jobs.” The TUC does not accept her claim on jobs and the economic boost of reducing these EU-derived rules, but notes her overtly hostile agenda towards workers’ rights.

– The TUC commissioned an independent legal opinion from Michael Ford QC on the consequences of Brexit for UK employment law and workers’ rights. A full copy can be found atwww.tuc.org.uk/sites/default/files/Brexit%20Legal%20Opinion.pdf

– Michael Ford QC’s legal opinion suggests that, based on past history and extant policy documents, the workers’ rights most vulnerable to repeal are:

  • Collective consultation, including the right for workers’ representatives to be consulted if major changes are planned that will change people’s jobs or result in redundancies (as have been used in recent major announcements in the steel industry).
  • Working time rules, including limits on working hours and rules on the amount of holiday pay a workers is entitled to.
  • EU-derived health and safety regulations.
  • Transfer of Undertakings (TUPE), i.e. the EU-derived protections to the terms and conditions of workers at an organisation or service that is transferred or outsourced to a new employer.
  • Protections for agency workers and other ‘atypical’ workers, such as part-time workers.
  • Current levels of compensation for discrimination of all kinds, including equal pay awards and age discrimination.

See paragraphs 3 and 107 of the opinion for an overview, and paragraphs 27 to 80 for full details.

As Michael Chessum says on the New Statesman site,

Lazy left-wing Brexit supporters are endangering the left’s future

The social and political forces driving Brexit are deeply reactionary, and only the most naïve, wishful thinking could imagine either that there is some undercurrent of “left-wing” ideas in the motives of most Leave voters, or that it is the left that would gain the most political space from Brexit.

But most of the political tendencies represented in the Lexit campaign – the SWP, and leftwing fragments either from or influenced by the old Communist Party – never expected or supported the rise of a left leadership in Labour. Deep down, they are in a state of strategic crisis as a result of Jeremy Corbyn’s victory. As a result, they are left repeating decades-old slogans – “the EU is a bosses’ club” – devoid of context or tactical thought; and they are running with the losing strategy of creating chaos on the Right’s terms in the desperate hope of gaining ground.

In the coming weeks, the British left will have a serious historical responsibility foisted upon it. It is vital that the left’s voice (which is overwhelmingly pro-Remain) does not become subsumed within David Cameron’s pitch – that we campaign on an unapologetically progressive platform, for freedom of movement, for social justice, and against the status quo in Europe. And those tempted by Leave should seriously question whether Lexit is a viable option at this referendum, or just a convenient cover for the very worst aspects of the British right.

 

Written by Andrew Coates

May 18, 2016 at 1:06 pm

Paul Mason: From Revolutionary Marxism to Radical Social Democracy and the Workers’ Bomb.

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Then raise the workers’ bomb on high,
Beneath its cloud we’ll gladly die,
For though it sends us all to hell,
It kills the ruling class as well.

The Workers’ Bomb.

(See: Posadist Paul Memes.)

Paul Mason is at the centre of new controversies, about his left politics, and about his support for nuclear weapons.

This is what he says about the former.  (Paul Mason Blog).

As to Mr Osborne’s claim that I am “revolutionary Marxist” it is completely inaccurate. I am radical social democrat who favours the creation of a peer-to-peer sector (co-ops, open source etc) alongside the market and the state, as part of a long transition to a post-capitalist economy. There’s a comprehensive critique of Bolshevism in my latest book, Postcapitalism: A Guide to Our Future.

Paul Mason was, we are informed, a member of the groupuscule, Workers Power, now better known amongst the masses for its ‘revolutionary’ Labour Party journal Red Flag.

Paul Mason’s book  PostCapitalism: A Guide to Our Future  (2015) uses many Marxist concepts (echoing Ernest Mandel on Kondratiev waves as in Long waves of capitalist development: the Marxist interpretation. 1980). This is the idea that capitalist development and crises, innovation and stagnation, are long-term cycles (we are on the downward one at present).

The core of PostCapitalism is a reflection, often interesting,  on “immaterial”labour, and the development of postcapitalism, a form of social order and economics,  within capitalism itself, fostered by the (apparent)  central role of information in the economy, civil society, and the state. His key concept is “networks v hierarchies”. This is a belief that that there is an inherent desire for a “beyond” capitalism in the search for human autonomy, although since he does not appear to have read Castoriadis or the current inspire by his works he would not use this term. He asserts, however clear tendencies in the direction of the current of thought that began with the 1950s/early 60s  review Socialisme ou Barbarie, and now has an influence on radical European ecologists”Eventually, work becomes voluntary, basic commodities and public services are free and economic management becomes primarily an issue of energy and resources, not capital and labour.”  It is important to note that in this objective everybody (as the Castoriadists would say) has an ‘interest’ in the ‘project’ – farewell then to the central agency of the working class and labour movement. (1)

That Mason has drawn on rather more radical politics and ideology than ‘radical social democratic’ ideas in the distant past (2011/12) can be seen in the book that preceded PostCapitalism.   His  Why It’s Kicking off Everywhere, The New Global Revolutions, uses the ‘autonomist’ idea of the ‘multitude’  – rather than just everybody – amongst other terms, to express the growth of resistance to the existing state of affairs. The multitude is the many against the few, Empire, or, in ‘populist’ form, the ‘elite’.

Mason wrote,

“the political theory that influenced the events of 2009-11” was Autonomism. They “had theorised very clearly the idea of a struggle between the ‘general intellect’, the suppressed human being and capitalist legal norms.” One can see that this offers at least one vehicle to express opposition to economic policies, to inequality, to lack of power. The ability to share and form new agencies of opposition has been made stronger by a technological and social order that needs instant, unrestricted, communication.

Why it’s Kicking Off Everywhere. The New Global Revolutions. Paul Mason. Review. Adnrew Coates.

To Mason there are signs of the “emancipated human being” emerging “spontaneously from within the breakdown of the old order”. The illumination of the multitude can be seen in the “act of taking a space and forming a community” – from Tahrir Square to Wall Street. This showed “the deployment of digital communications at work, in social life, and now in the forms of protest.” But in the tradition Mason refers to, there are more sceptical strands. Capital and the state can colonise such “smooth spaces” (democratic and equal areas) and make them “striated” (integrated into established exploitation and power) is less obvious (A Thousand Plateaus. Gilles Deleuze. Félix Guattari. 2003)

This is the theoretical background:

These theorists considered that globalisation and ‘Empire’ (its political-economic inter-tangling) were creating a new ‘nomadic’ (Félix Guattari) form of resistance: the “multitude”. (Multitude. Michael Hardt, Antonio Negri 2004) Negri, Hardt and others from the ‘autonomist’ tradition considered that in contemporary capitalism, the “general intellect” and ‘immaterial labour” (production and communication by the manipulation of symbols) were centre stage. Paulo Virno described post-Fordism as a “communism of capital”, “A communality of generalised intellect without material equality.” (A Grammar of the Multitude. 2004.)

For Hardt and Negri a general figure, made up of “all the diverse forms of social production”, emerges. This the multitude. It is “an open and expansive network in which all differences can be expressed freely and equally, a network that provides the means of encounter so that we can work and live in common.” It is a “living alternative” to the domination of Capital and Empire – the entangled economic, “biopolitical” and sovereign rule of Nations. This ‘network’ is the future paradigm for revolutionary change, its imprint flourishes everywhere, its future open.

Negri and Hardt observed examples of this operating, in the anti-globalisation campaigns of the 1990s, and early new century. Such resistance showed up most famously in the Mexican  Zapatistas, and, travelling down to a region where revolts never died down, in the rest of Latin America. For John Holloway, building on several decades of similar work, there was a world-wide “Scream of refusal” of people refusing to accept Capital and the State (Crack Capitalism. 2010).

Negri also talked of how the proletariat was enlarged, giving it “productive functions that were once typical of the middle class” (Goodbye Mr Socialism. 2008). May 68 was only the “first revolt of the post-Fordist and cognitive proletariat” against global capitalism. Europe was not resigned to the rule of business. 1996 saw France explode in nation-wide union-led strikes and protests against neo-liberal public reforms that brought down Alain Juppé’s Cabinet (though not the President). Many at the time saw that as defining set back for neo-liberalism. Negri enlarged the field of class conflict to the “precariat”, the partially employed and often unemployed, and saw this as a social factor behind the 2006 “local insurgencies” in the French banlieues.

No doubt Mason has changed the distant time of 2012, when it must be underlined that these ideas circulated in a rich broth of concepts, emotions, and reports. For the present it is indeed hard to see how his more recent belief (in Postcapitalism) that the pro-business Scottish Nationalist party, dedicated to looking after its “ain folk” or claim that the populist leader centred (Pablo Iglesias) and hierarchically organised Podemos represents a ‘network’.

Mason’s views on the Bomb are now the centre of interest, not all of it of the most serious quality.

This is his call:

A new defence doctrine for Labour Keep Trident. End expeditionary warfare

Vote for renewal of a Trident-capable force of four submarines, while retaining the right move from CASD to a CASD-capable submarine force, subject to parliamentary approval. At the same time, if the Scottish government votes to scrap Trident, Labour should advocate the removal of the base from Faslane to a base in England.

His argument?

Labour cannot un-invent its unilateralist wing, and it must listen to those who took to the streets calling for it to scrap Trident. Having listened, it must offer them something more important: a Labour party ready to rule; a government ready to break the cycle of failed expeditionary wars; which can fight terrorism effectively and stabilise NATO’s relationship with Russia in Europe.

To do this Labour needs more than just a position on Trident. It needs a defence doctrine.

Which is,

  • a nuclear deterrent whose posture can change in response to global circumstances, and whose specific terms of use are made clear to adversaries and allies alike;
  • a conventional force designed around Britain’s NATO mission in Europe, to deter potential Russian aggression and to facilitate the major powers of Western Europe taking charge of stabilising the region, rather than having to jump to the demands of immature democracies of Eastern Europe.
  • an enhanced anti-terror capability pre-authorised to operate on British soil in the face of a Mumbai-style attack, and whose surveillance and intelligence operations come under increased democratic scrutiny.

Since neither Mason nor the Tendance are defence experts, or indeed have views of any depth on these topics, we leave it to others to comment.

Meanwhile we intend to have a good laugh.

(1) Recent books on this which are worth reading include: Manuel Cervera-Marzal, Eric Fabri (dir.), Autonomie ou Barbarie. La démocratie radicale de Cornelius Castoriadis et ses défis contemporains, éditions du Passager clandestin, 2015. Cornelius Castoriadis et Claude Lefort : L’expérience démocratique 2015.  Collectif (Auteur), Nicolas Poirier.   François Dosse, Castoriadis, une vie, La Découverte, 2014. Cornelius Castoriadis ou l’autonomie radicale Broché – 23 avril 2014 Serge Latouche

Written by Andrew Coates

April 8, 2016 at 4:57 pm

Momentum. Membership: Labour and Supporters, *not* Members of Other Political Parties.

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This from the latest mailing to Momentum supporters:

Yesterday, Momentum’s National Committee met for the first time. The 52 person, gender balanced Committee is made up of delegates from Wales, Scotland, all nine English regions, equalities or liberation groups, trade unions and existing Labour movement organisations.

The Committee debated and decided on six national campaign objectives for the next three months.

  1. Campaigning for Labour in May’s elections (English local and mayoral, Welsh Assembly, and Scottish Parliament).
  2. Building for the People’s Assembly march for Health, Homes, Jobs, and Education on 16 April and developing with local groups specific campaigns and activities under these banners.
  3. Assisting Labour members to have their voice heard on Labour’s National Executive Committee.
  4. Helping mainstream, grassroots Labour members be represented at the next Party Conference in September.
  5. Supporting the Campaign For Nuclear Disarmament demonstration against Trident renewal on 27 February.
  6. Mobilising for Westminster by-elections to repeat the success of the Oldham West and Royton by-election of last year.

 

The Committee decided that Momentum should become a membership organisation.

Members of other political parties will not be eligible for membership of Momentum.

Membership will be open to Labour members, affiliated supporters, and supporters of the aims and values of the Labour Party, who are not members of other political parties (except the Co-Operative Party, which has an electoral agreement with Labour). We’ll email you with more details very soon.

About Momentum.

As the successor to the campaign to elect Jeremy Corbyn as leader of the Labour Party, Momentum is a Labour Party focused organization and its structure must reflect that. Momentum seeks to strengthen the Labour Party by increasing participation and engagement at local, regional and national levels. Furthermore, Momentum is committed to supporting the Labour Party winning elections and entering government. It seeks to use its base in the Labour Party and Labour movement to reach out to the 99% of people who are not currently in any political party, spread Labour values and increase Labour Party membership.

WHAT DOES MOMENTUM WANT TO DO?

● Organise in every town, city and village to secure the election of a progressive left Labour Party at every level, and to create a mass movement for real transformative change

More details via link above.

Where does the key decision, “.Members of other political parties will not be eligible for membership of Momentum” leave this Socialist Party initiated organisation?

Trade Union Momentum

John McInally Public and Commercial Services Union Vice-President (personal capacity).

The idea for Trade Union Momentum sprang from the need to build a trade union based anti-austerity movement from outside as well as inside the Labour Party and autonomous from it, based on a clear no cuts, no privatisation anti-austerity programme, campaigning on concrete issues like cuts, the pay freeze, privatisation and the anti-union laws.

This would be by building in workplaces and communities around the country with affiliations from trade unions, trades councils and individual union members.

Providing a platform for socialists and anti-austerity activists, inclusive of the Socialist Party, the National Shop Stewards Network and others not members of the Labour Party, in a widely based alliance, could be an important, even critical factor in defending the Corbyn/McDonnell leadership and building the anti-austerity movement.

The Socialist 9th of January 2016.

The Socialist Party, along with the Socialist Workers Party, and others, were involved the Trade Union and Socialist Coalition whichs tood candidates in competition with Labour in the last election.

2015 general election

TUSC stood 135 prospective parliamentary candidates across England, Wales and Scotland,[5] as well as 619 council candidates in local elections.

The organisation announced in October 2014 that it had received a guarantee of funding from Socialist Alliance.  The funds would provide for one hundred deposits in parliamentary contests, as well as a Party Political Broadcast.

The party performed badly at the election, winning 36,327 votes, or 0.1% of the popular vote. No parliamentary seats were gained and no deposits were saved.

Wikipedia.

This their strategy for the 2016 local elections:

TUSC steering committee agrees 2016 council candidates selection timetable

The TUSC national steering committee met this week and agreed a timetable and procedures to approve candidates for the English local council elections taking place on Thursday May 5th. It also agreed a Guide for TUSC Candidates and Agents, available as a downloadable PDF at http://www.tusc.org.uk/txt/359.pdf

The steering committee recognises that the election of Jeremy Corbyn as Labour leader on an anti-austerity platform has changed the political situation compared to the first five years of TUSC’s existence and that this effects how our coalition will approach the May polls.

Although the big majority of Labour councillors did not support Jeremy for leader, TUSC’s local election platform, Build on Jeremy Corbyn’s Anti-Austerity Call – A Councillors’ Revolt Could Stop the Tory cuts! (see http://tusc.org.uk/policy.php) is clear that “TUSC will work with any Labour councillor who backs the call to refuse to implement the cuts”. There will not be TUSC candidates standing against councillors who vote against cuts in the council chamber.

Clearly ‘Trade Union Momentum’ is not the same as Momentum. 

This should be made clear.

TUSC intends sending out ultimatums to Labour candidates. No doubt on the strength of their 2015 0.1% General Election vote.

That is their right.

But this is not the kind of activity that a group which wishes to change, through democratic persuasion, through Labour structures, the party’s policies and culture, should tolerate.

Written by Andrew Coates

February 8, 2016 at 11:49 am

Galloway: Labour Ought to Beg Me to Return.

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Site of Galloway’s Christmas Dinner Fundraiser.

After his successful London Mayor campaign launch  George Galloway is looking to the political future.

George Galloway interview: Labour should be begging me to return.

Reports Politics Co.UK.

Newshound Robert McGregor trackled the retiring figure down.

Here are some of the highlights.

“Galloway commented earlier this year about the possibility of re-joining the Labour Party if Corbyn won. Has it been discussed?”

Jeremy has been my friend and comrade for over 30 years,” he replies. “In fact most videos of my speeches have him sitting next to me. I know the media keep asking him about this subject and I know why he has difficulties answering it – he has enough problems with remaining Blairites without opening a new front over me. Although some Blairites like John McTernan and Jim Murphy I’m sure would encourage Corbyn to go for it. On the other side, Ken Livingstone recently went on the record in support of my re-admission to the Labour party. But my position remains the same; the Labour party should rescind my unjust war-time expulsion, opposed at the time by Mr Foot, Mr Benn and of course Jeremy Corbyn”

In this context the Great Man talks of a possible opening to Scottish Labour.

The interviewer one  Robert McGregor comments, “It would be foolish for Scottish Labour not to at least consider a Galloway comeback.

Galloway concedes that he couldn’t return to Scottish Labour and fight London Labour for the mayoralty at the same time. “But time is short to do anything about that. My London campaign is moving up the gears….”

The campaign promises to be a tough one, with Galloway already scoring a significant 0,1% in opinion polls.

Embedded image permalink

Two Horse Race.

Written by Andrew Coates

January 13, 2016 at 4:37 pm

Birmingham Trojan Horse Inquiry: Headteacher Jahangir Akbar receives life ban for inflicting religious intolerance on pupils.

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Shame of devout Islamic Headmaster who tried to enforce his religion on state school.

Trojan horse headteacher receives lifetime ban for professional misconduct.

Reports the Guardian.

Jahangir Akbar, formerly of Oldknow academy in Birmingham, removed sex education from curriculum and banned celebration of Christmas and Diwali.

A headteacher who was accused of misconduct in the so-called Trojan horse scandal in Birmingham has been banned indefinitely from teaching after being found guilty of professional misconduct.

Jahangir Akbar, who was the acting headteacher of Oldknow academy in Small Heath, Birmingham, was found by a disciplinary hearing to have “failed to uphold public trust in the profession and maintain high standards of ethics and behaviours”. Investigators said he allowed an undue amount of religious influence on the education of pupils at his school.

The Birmingham Post reports however this,

The former headteacher of a Trojan Horse-linked school in Birmingham has been handed an “indefinite” teaching ban – but could be back in the classroom in five years time.

Jahangir Akbar , the former acting principal of Oldknow Academy in Small Heath, was last month found guilty of professional misconduct following a hearing by the government-run National College for Teaching & Leadership (NCTL).

Now the Department for Education has revealed the 38-year-old has become the first teacher in Britain to be sanctioned for allowing an “undue amount of religious influence” on pupils’ education.

One has little doubt that the kind of person in the NUT who backed this creature will come up with an explanation….

Written by Andrew Coates

January 5, 2016 at 4:28 pm

George Galloway, Posadist, “Every terrorist will be shot down dead, and if I can, I will pull the trigger myself from my Sputnik.”

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Watch out World: Galloway is in Orbit!

George Galloway has been a busy bee.

Here is Galloway this morning:

Here was Galloway yesterday:

Here was also Galloway yesterday.

This yet again was Galloway yesterday:

He even claims that Russia is the forefront of the fight against the Daesh genociders.

Forgetting perhaps that it was welcome US air-support that saved the Kurds from in Kobane from mass murder.

Here was him last week.

The police will find a friend in me,” he added.

Every terrorist will be shot down dead, and if I can, I will pull the trigger myself.

“I say to the police officer in the room, when it comes to your wages, your resources and your strengthening, you can count on me.”

Speculation is rife that Galloway plans to follow Vladimir Putin and wrestle a terrorist, bare-handed, to the ground.

He is there, up in space, with a new Communist civilisation, orbiting the earth, just waiting……

Here is an earlier incarnation of Sputnik.

 

Written by Andrew Coates

November 29, 2015 at 12:53 pm

Portuguese Socialists, Left Bloc and Communists Look Set to Govern.

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Rejeitar o Governo PSD/CDS para mudar de política: Reject the PSD/CDS Government to Change Politics. say Portuguese Communists.

The BBC reports.

Socialists ready to head left-wing coalition in Portugal

Three left-of-centre parties in Portugal say they have reached a deal to form a government after last month’s inconclusive general election.

It means the centre-right coalition of Prime Minister Pedro Passos Coelho now looks set to fail in its attempt to stay in office.

Socialist Party leader Antonio Costa fought the election promising to ease back on austerity.

He has the support of two smaller far-left parties, including the Communists.

Mr Passos Coelho’s centre-right party polled just under 37% in October’s election, with the Socialists on over 32%.

He was sworn in for a second term, but earlier this week he said his coalition appeared to have lost its absolute majority in parliament.

With 99 seats in the 230-seat parliament, the ruling coalition fell 17 seats short of the number it needed.

Mr Passos Coelho had indicated that he was ready to talk to other parties in parliament to pursue the “necessary reforms” he wants to implement.

But the Socialists, the Communists and the Left Bloc between them have 122 seats, enough for a parliamentary majority.

Left Bloc won 10% of the vote, securing 19 seats, while the Communists took 8% of the vote.

“The conditions are in place to bring down the right-wing coalition government and for the Socialist Party to form a government,” said the Portuguese Communist Party in a statement late on Friday.

Many in Portugal, including President Aníbal Cavaco Silva, are concerned about the impact on the country’s finances and international standing if the far-left gains influence in government, the BBC Alison Roberts in Lisbon reports.

But the president could soon have little choice but to ask the Socialist leader to take over.

A vote on the centre-right administration’s programme is due on Tuesday, and if it loses, the government will fall.

“If I am not prime minister as of Tuesday it will be because the Socialists did not let me continue,” said Mr Passos Coelho.

This follows the same story in El País yesterday.

Los partidos de izquierdas sellan un pacto de gobierno en Portugal

The Communist Party of Portugal announced late on Friday that it had reached a deal with the Socialists to form a government of the left. An agreement ending 40 years of differences.

The announcement of the PC plus by the Bloco de Esquerdas yesterday, is that the socialist party led by António Costa is willing to offer an alternative government overrides attempts by the country’s president, Anibal Cavaco Silva, to usher in, the current government, which took office seven days ago.

The left alliance totals 122 votes to 107 on the right coalition.

The change over will take place in a Parliamentary vote to reject the new right-wing government on Tuesday.

The Communists and their allies in the union federation, the CGTP, plan a mass demonstration on that day outside the National Assembly.

El País remarks that this recalls a large protest outside the same building 40 years ago, which forced the MPs to abandon the edifice where a new constitution was being drafted.

The present Portuguese Prime Minister Pedro Passos Coelho has not lost hope of clinging onto office. 

Background: Portugal: ‘Europe is very concerned’ as new gov’t likely short-lived By Dick Nichols

“The incoming government of Portugal will most probably prove to be the briefest in modern Portuguese history.”

Portuguese elections: surge in Left Bloc support puts Socialist Party on the spot.

By Dick Nichols  Will Portugal finally see the end of austerity as administered for four years by the right-wing coalition of the Social-Democratic Party (PSD) and Democratic and Social Centre—People’s Party (CDS-PP)?

 

Written by Andrew Coates

November 7, 2015 at 12:44 pm

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