Tendance Coatesy

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After the Summer of Love, the Summer of Labour as Counter-Power: Paul Mason.

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After the Summer of Love the Summer of Labour as Counter-Power.

Corbyn: the summer of hierarchical things Paul Mason.

Labour can become the counter-power.

Extracts,

My first experience of the labour movement was going to the Leigh Miners’ Gala, in the 1960s, aged about six or seven. I remember, amid the tight throng of people, one striking image: a boxing ring, in which a local slugger was taking on all comers.

The flesh of the fighters was red and bruised. One man had blood on his face, another a stupid smile: the challengers were mainly drunk. They slammed their gloves into each other’s ribs with such force I can hear it now.

And then my father’s hand slid up to my forehead and covered my eyes. “Don’t look,” he said.

That’s what the working class gained by forming a movement of its own. Something that could co-exist with the brutality of everyday life and at the same time shield us from it. Something that allowed you to live inside the system and at the same time nurture the ideal of something different.

Years later I discovered there was a word to describe this: “counter-power”. A set of ideas, traditions and actions that lets you both survive within capitalism and fight against it.

..

After 2008, the counter-power was reborn. No longer centred on the old working class, it was simply “us” — the crapped-upon masses. The barista, the courier, the lawyer, the shipping clerk. Those were the people I met occupying Gezi Park in Istanbul in 2013. Anarchists in black balaclavas yes — but also pissed-off guy with gym membership and a Besiktas season ticket.

The 2011–13 uprisings — Tahrir, Occupy, the Spanish indignados, Taksim, Brasil — were mass phenomena that, even when suppressed and defeated, left a residue: ideas, patterns of organisation, networks, as Manuel Castells put it, of “outrage and hope”.

..

Finally came the Brexit referendum: the ultimate act of miscalculation, in which Project Fear 2.0 misfired and the UK kickstarted the breakup of globalisation.

You can take the state, said Gramsci: but capital has line after line of trenches and fortifications beyond it.

..

Corbyn’s victory in 2015, Brexit in 2016 and the near victory of the Scottish yes campaign in 2014 all held out the possibility of a effortless exit from a dying and unpopular neo-liberal structure.

A kind of “free revolution”, handed to you by a hapless elite, where all you had to do was tick a box.

But revolutions are never effortless. The revolution that’s put Podemos on 20% in Spain, and Syriza into power in Greece, involved masses of people on the streets, resisting the elite’s attacks, and creating a new kind of power in communities and on the streets and in universities and schools.

This is the modern counter-power, and Corbyn’s election was only ever a reflection of it.

Detailed comment would be superfluous on such momentous thoughts.

We can only suggest that people read the full version.

Brief Notes for further reflection on Cde Mason’s theses.

  • The break-up of globalisation begun by Brexit. Really?
  • Near victory of pro-business nationalists in Scotland as a near triumph for opponents of neo-liberalism….sure….
  • Podemos, who recently failed to get anywhere near power (despite predictions that they would win) in recent election as example of ‘counter-power’.   (Spain’s Conservative PP wins rerun election, Podemos upset by surprisingly low results:  2016 election results PP 33.02%; PSOE 22.68%; UNIDOS PODEMOS 21.11%; Abstentions 30.16% )
  • The latest version of the Indignados, Nuit Debout, in France, already disintegrating in abstraction and futility.
  • Ah yes Syriza, Greece. Well.

I never liked Boxing me.

Or the film Fight Club.

Written by Andrew Coates

July 13, 2016 at 4:16 pm

Ipswich: Ben Gummer Tory MP and Remain Campaigner Defends Migrants.

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Ben Gummer

 

Racism against Eastern European migrants is just vile – we should be thankful for what they do, says Ipswich MP Ben Gummer

Evening star.

If you go to Handford Road in the early hours, when most British people are still asleep, you will see minibuses filling with Eastern European migrants, going off to work gutting chickens in a job that the Job Centres fail to get British people to do.

Hold that thought when you consider the vile eruptions of racism since Nigel Farage’s ‘Independence Day’ two weeks ago. Employees at a depot in Thetford chanting “you’re going home” to Eastern European colleagues; a Polish centre in Hammersmith sprayed with ‘Go Home’ in the middle of the night; a notice – charmingly written in Polish – encouraging Poles to ‘go home’, picked up by a little 11-year-old Polish boy; notes left on cars telling ‘Polish vermin’ to leave the country; a European man berated on a Manchester tram by some thug who told him to “**** off home”.

What has happened to our country? Whatever side of the debate you were on, no-one can deny that we are now a nation terribly divided, with intolerance unleashed.

Some have said to me that it’s a limited problem, an issue that has “always been there” – as if there is something inevitable about this treatment of foreigners, and that in the release the hatred will go away. They could not be more wrong. It is right that people should be ashamed to express racist sentiments, even if it is what they believe in their hearts.

That is why politicians should be so very careful in how they use words: by using language carelessly, by stoking fear of migrants, they can seem to permit something that is rightly impermissible.

Do not imagine that this is a sentiment reserved for bovine thugs: it exists behind many polite doors and neat gardens in our own town. Time and again I heard “I’m not a racist but…”, beginning a sentence that revealed a fear of foreigners and a wish to see them gone.

Most carefully, people express concerns about school class sizes and GP waiting lists. These concerns might be legitimate but they are rightly levelled at us politicians, not at the migrants on whom these problems in public services are so often blamed.

After all, the average EU migrant is more likely to be in work, paying taxes, than us Brits, helping to build – both in money and in labour – the classrooms all of our children need. And those GP queues? They are more the result of British people getting older – not young fit Lithuanian men, who rarely need a doctor.

I add this,

Shop owner describes arson attack at eastern European store in Magdalen Street, Norwich

 I know Ben Gummer.

His office is about ten minutes from my gaff.

We have had conversations about Noam Chomsky.

I am a political opponent of Ben,  he said, when out campaigning for Remain on his Tory stall (which obviously I had not part in) that this must be the first time in his life that he and me had been on the same side.

We fight the class struggle democratically.

Ben knows as well as I do that this racism has got beyond a joke.

Us lot in Ipswich are pretty close.

His words are very carefully weighed.

They merit utmost attention: Mit brennender Sorge.

Written by Andrew Coates

July 9, 2016 at 12:10 pm

Young People Gather in anti-Brexit rally.

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Pro-EU Rally At Trafalgar Square Attracts Thousands Despite Event Being Cancelled Due To ‘Unprecedented’ Response.

Reports the Huffington Post.

Thousands of pro-EU supporters have marched to Parliament where they are chanting anti-Brexit slogans after gathering in London’s Trafalgar Square where a scheduled rally was earlier cancelled.

Pictures emerged on social media soon after 6pm showing crowds of people holding pro-EU banners aloft at Trafalgar Square despite steady showers. Hours later they were seen chanting pro-EU slogans at Westminster.

More than 50,000 people had been expected to attend the London Stays rally which aimed to show the world that “London stands with Europe”.

Channel Four last night stated that the people on the rally were predominantly young.

Yet, indications are: no copies of the Socialist sold, and recruitment to the SWP, and Counterfire: zero.

Equally reports from the pro-Corbyn rally the previous evening state that these groups had failed to lead the masses.

To remedy this Coatesy has the following top-tips: getting down with the kidz  for revolutionary recruiters.

  • Young people are like fruit flies. They can’t remember all that stuff about what a group did as long ago as last week. Campaigning for Brexit? Phooey! Undermining the Labour Party and Jeremy Corbyn: that’s all, like, history. The important thing is now you are the best supporters of Jeremy Corbyn.
  • Lessons: young folk love lessons. Tell them about the Wigan Labour Club voters and their concerns about ‘immigration’ . That will go down a treat with the class conscious people who demonstrated yesterday. Sort out the wheat from the chaff.
  • Young ‘uns adore limpets. Many have a limpet vivarium in the their bathrooms.  Stick to them. They will surely appreciate this.

 

Written by Andrew Coates

June 29, 2016 at 10:12 am

The Allies of Brexit ‘Left’: Bleak Racist ‘Lamberistists.’

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Anti-Eu Scabs Toast Victory.

The Scab left has not been slow to react to the Referendum result.

“The referendum result may well go down in history as the pitchfork moment“, declared the Financial Times (FT), wailing the anger and despair of Britain’s elite at the decision by the majority of voters in Britain to leave the European Union.

In fact, the revolt took place despite the complete failure of the majority of leaders of the trade union movement and, unfortunately, also Jeremy Corbyn to put an independent working class position in the referendum by leading a socialist, internationalist campaign for exit completely independent from and in opposition to the ‘Little Englanders’ of UKIP and Co.

But while the capitalist class are in chaos, it is urgent that the working class finds its own political voice. The referendum result shows the enormous potential for a mass fight back against austerity in Britain. The task is to create a mass political party capable of leading such a fight back, politically armed with socialist policies.

So says the apparently ‘socialist’ the Socialist.

Campaigning against ‘cheeep migrant labour is not enough for this group.

If there is one thing that has come to the fore in recent weeks it is the alliance of the Socialist Party, Lexit, leaders of the RMT, and the Morning Star, with the ‘European’ (French) groupuscle, the Parti ouvrier indépendant démocratique (POID).

This is how the group heralded the referendum result.

Une victoire pour la classe ouvrière britannique, une victoire pour les travailleurs et les peuples de toute l’Europe.

This body, if one can call a living corpse, though it has a former French PM, Lional Jospin and a present Parti  Socialiste General  Secretary as it s former members,  has a long history.

Beginning with their historic founder, Pierre Lambert (Pierre Boussel).

Accused of having given the names of other Resistance figures to the Germans, Lambert’s  much more established legacy is his collaboration with the American secret service during the creation of the anti-Communist Force ouvrière. In 68 his group, the OCI physicality attacked ‘petty bourgeois’ students. Their violence and hatred is notorious on the French left.

I have personally seen them in action.

Switch to now: Gérard Schivardi, part of the faction which organised the  infamous Paris meting for Brexit.

He predicts “l’inévitable guerre des religions”, the inevitable  war of religions  and accuses Marine Le Pen of having nicked his ideas, “piquer toutes mes idées de 2007.

What allies, what politics.

 

Written by Andrew Coates

June 25, 2016 at 10:05 am

Internationalism, Ipswich and the EU Referendum: Vote Remain!

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Tossed by the Waves Of Hate, but Ipswich Internationalists Vote Remain.

Internationalism, Ipswich and the EU referendum: Vote Remain!

All men are Brethren. Equality, Liberty and Fraternity. Heroic citizens – the thunder-notes of your victory have sounded across the Channel, awakening the sympathies and hopes of every lover of liberty….Accept our fraternal salutations and our earnest wishes that the French Republic may triumph over its enemies and become a model for the imitation of the world. Vive La République! (1)

A Republic for France: the Charter for England.”  Rally Ipswich Corn Hill. 1848.

Ipswich is an ancient town. Sited on the estuary of the river Orwell, whose upper reaches are called the Gipping, Ipswich is Gipperswich. The remains of a Roman villa have been found in the suburbs. The settlement itself is Saxon, the street plan of the centre remains the same as laid down in the 7th century: Carr Street-Tavern Street-Cornhill-Westgate street. Kilns producing pottery, “Ipswich ware” were established.

Ipswich ware owes its origins to the Rhineland and Frisia. Dorstadt on the Lek Rhine is known to have controlled the trade routes from the Rhine and the Baltic in the eighth and ninth centuries, and Ipswich is on the shortest route from Rhine mouth. (2)

Ipswich is an old town. Walking around the centre you pass medieval churches, half-timbered buildings, like the famous Ancient House, and the pub, the Spread Eagle, and, at the head of a beautiful park, the sixteenth century Christchurch mansion, which stands on the site of the Augustinian Priory of the Holy Trinity, founded c.1177. Just next to the entrance is St Margaret’s plain, named after a Dutch word reflecting the centuries long presence of traders from Holland. Reminders of its port and trading history ere everywhere. Near to the quayside is the old Jewish cemetery, which commentates  the presence of a group of merchants who established a synagogue (no longer there) in Rope Walk.

Ipswich is working class town. The docks, for centuries the basis of the local economy, and the engineering works, may have shrunk as employers, but the majority of the people work in manual, service and ordinary clerical jobs. There is a large migrant population, Portuguese speakers, Eastern Europeans, over a thousand Kurds, and countless others, as well as longer established minority communities, principally Bangladeshi and Caribbean. Many people are mixed ethnicity. Passing by Rope Walk to the centre in the morning you can hear a dozen languages being spoken and see Polish, Chinese, Kurdish, Turkish barbers, an Indian-Bengali restaurant, a Lebanese-Moroccan restaurant…..

Ipswich is a town with a long-standing left and a labour movement. The anti-slavery campaigner Thomas Clarkson, a supporter of the early French revolution, and in my view one of the best people to have ever lived, made it his home. He is commentated in a street name. Rallies and activism against slavery attracted thousands. During the Chartist movement hey-day John Cook’s Radical Infidel Repository in Upper Orwell Street sold the Northern Star. Later in the century trade unions founded the local labour party. A newsagent’s by Grimwade Street sold Socialist publications, such as the Social Democratic Federation’s Justice. There was strong suffragette movement….

Today we have a Tory MP (following Labour ones) but Labour controls the Borough council and the Trades Council is left wing. There were large protests against the County Council’s austerity and privatisation programme.

Ipswich is a generous and warm town. During the terrible Ipswich serial killings in 2006  two young anarchist women organised a Reclaim the Night demonstration. It was attend by the left, councillors and members of every political party, the public, and the Salvation Army. Refusing stigmatisation Ipswich people and the local media declared that the victims were “Somebody’s daughter”. This love and compassion stuck deep into our hearts.

Ipswich is an internationalist town. When the refugee crisis first erupted a hastily organised rally by the Giles Statue took place. Around a hundred heard speeches from people expressing solidarity. The work of local refugee supporters continues.

The words of 1848 rally, “we are all brethren”, still echo. Ipswich is, by trade, commerce and industry, by politics, and by people, an internationalist town. Faced with the hate of those attacking migrants, foreigners, and ‘Brussels’, there is one response: unity not division. To vote for the European Union is to listen to that call, to build our ties together, to fight for a better world. Another Europe is Possible!

(1) Page 80. Chartism in Essex and Suffolk. A.F.J.Brown 1982.
(2) Page 99. The Suffolk Landscape. Norman Scarfe. Hodder & Stoughton. 1972.

Written by Andrew Coates

June 23, 2016 at 10:27 am

Brexit ‘Left’ Reaches Delusional Stage and Talks of ‘Commonwealth’.

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Lexit: Desperate last-minute Flailing.

As the left and the labour Movement, from the trade unions, the Party to the majority of radical groups,  stand increasingly united behind a Remain Vote the Brexit ‘left’ is desperate.

They are scrambling round for self-justification.

From whingeing about the ‘absence of a working class voice” in the referendum,  Socialist Worker has been reduced to asserting that, “A socialist Europe is not on the ballot paper and there is no method for reforming the EU.”

Oddly this a Referendum about membership of the EU, and it does not include an option to vote for the SWP either.

Nor does saying three times that the EU cannot be changed make the claim true.

John McDonnell says,

Labour is pushing for an ambitious programme of reforms that will make the EU work for the best interests of working people here and across Europe.

For example, all the EU member states have a share in the European Investment Bank (EIB). The UK’s share is 16 per cent, equivalent to its size inside the EU. But the Tories have failed to make the most of it, with the UK only receiving 11 per cent of funding. If we took our fair share of the extra funding that the EIB has offered, that would be £35bn of additional investment. That’s more than double the entire UK public investment spend for a year.

The SWP’s position would have us not even try to get this ideas on the practical agenda.

This argument in today’s The Socialist, plumbs the depths of delusion.

voters – particularly working class voters – are increasingly seeing the referendum as a chance to protest both against Cameron and everything they have suffered in recent years: low pay, zero-hour contracts, benefit cuts, the lack of affordable housing, and public services cut to the bone. One poll shows that 60% of ‘blue collar’ workers intend to vote for exit.

What is the basis of this ‘blue collar’ (not a Marxist category) support for Brexit?

There is no mention in this article of something too obvious, er, to mention.

Socialist Party ‘aligned’ Trade Unionists Against the EU leaders Enrico Tortolano and Ragesh Khakhria (both part of the PCS which officially has a neutral stand during the referendum) get to grips with the issue of what motives this support in the Morning Star.

They observe, in arguing for something now called a ‘People’s Brexit‘  that,

….millions of working-class voters are unrepresented by the mainstream political parties and large chunks of the trade union movement.

The stance and position of those who are supposed to represent labour is at odds with the experience of the working class in Britain as well as the rest of the EU.

Working-class people are experiencing unemployment or insecure jobs, low pay, no pension with little prospect of owning their own home, or living in secure council housing.

It’s nonsense to pretend that the movement of more people into these communities is having no impact on their lives.

Rich Tories have already cut schools and hospitals they use to the bone.

For the metropolitan liberal elite, far removed from such concerns, the prospect of a people’s Brexit simply violates their sense of entitlement and jeopardises the prospect of middle-class benefits that the working class will never see.

So ‘movement of more people’ – free movement of labour in the European Union – is a problem which has created support for Brexit. Only the ‘metropolitan liberal elite’ –  do not see this reality.

This is clearly at odds with Socialist Worker’s charges against “Fortress Europe”. They charge the EU with putting up barriers to refugees and migrants from outside the Continent. SW notes that the Official Remain campaign is led by those who want to “regain control” of Britain’s borders.

Does the Socialist Party and Trade Unionists Against the EU want to regain “control” over UK frontiers, stop the flow of “cheap labour” that is having an “impact” on “communities”?

If so, how?

And if the SWP opposes such moves, why are they backing a vote for those whose entire project in recent weeks has been centred on a hate campaign against migrant workers

Perhaps we should consider not just migrants and refugees on the frontiers of Europe but   “people” in “movement” who have come to Britian. Khakhria and  Tortolano, whose own forebears were no doubt in “movement” have no answer to this issue.

The pair note, no doubt wistfully, that,

Historically, the labour movement and Labour leaders such as Clement Attlee and Hugh Gaitskell felt a much greater affinity with the Commonwealth countries than they did to the capitalist Common Market.

Yes, New Zealand Lamb and butter, that’s the best reply to the ‘capitalist’ EU.

 

Tariq Ali joins with Smears against Jo Cox.

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Tariq Ali: Better off tilting at Windmills than engaging in Politics.

Recently former Marxist Tariq Ali made a return to British politics.

He starred at the 13th of June Camden “rally of shame” calling for Brexit, or as they tried to call it, Lexit (left Exit, geddit?).

London says #Lexit: The Left Case Against the EU – Tariq Ali.

Ali stood on the same platform as Caroline Tacchella, a representative of the Parti ouvrier indépendant démocratique, a French Trotskyist group, whose historical record even a genial codger like Tariq must remember with loathing.

The group from which this micro-party originates (the ‘Lambertists’) are famous for opposing the French students in 1968.

In a celebrated confrontation hundreds of this sect’s Service d’ordre  paraded in military style, demanding that the petty bourgeois intellectuals not build barricades in the Sorbonne but wait for the working class and its vanguard (not unrelated to the said Lambertists, known at the time as the Organisation Communiste Internationaliste, OCI) to lead the movement.

Ali, one might possibly know, is one-time student leader, and the author of self-congratulatory writings on 68, (1968 and After: Inside the Revolution, 1978, Street Fighting Years: An Autobiography of the Sixties ,1987 and others too numerous for even their author to have read) one would expect him to know that particularly history and shun any association with the Lambertists.

Update (from JM)

The British arm of this sect, publishes Workers’ Tribune, whose latest issue you can download here.

Many of those leftist youths, the anciens combattants, or vétérans as we, a decade or more younger, used to call them in Paris, not without a hint of affectionate mockery, have kept the course.

Others have fallen by the wayside.

None in a more spectacular fashion than Ali in his present convulsions.

From spitting on the grave of our comrades at Charlie Hebdo, to backing Brexit, and now...this:

 

Written by Andrew Coates

June 21, 2016 at 4:22 pm