Tendance Coatesy

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The Great Replacement, Violent White Nationalism, from Christchurch to El Paso.

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Far-Right Call that Inspires Terrorism.

El Paso Massacre: Nihilism, Narcissism and White Nationalism

The alleged gunman is suspected of posting a 2,300-word manifesto titled “The Inconvenient Truth” moments before the attack. The manifesto referenced the Christchurch massacres in New Zealand that killed 51. According to the New York Times, the Christchurch mass murderer referenced:

“a white supremacist theory called ‘the great replacement.” The theory has been promoted by a French writer named Renaud Camus, and argues that elites in Europe have been working to replace white Europeans with immigrants from the Middle East and North Africa.” 

Psychology Today.Ravi Chandra

The Daily Beast perhaps has the best take on the influence of these ideas,

Kelly Weill: From El Paso to Christchurch, a Racist Lie Is Fueling Terrorist Attacks

Alleged killers in Christchurch, New ZealandPoway, California; and El Paso, Texas believed a theory that claims white people are being “replaced” by people of color through mass immigration. Conspiracy theorists often falsely claim this is a deliberate effort by any number of groups demonized on the far right: liberals, Democrats, Jews, Muslims. It’s the theory peddled by white supremacist groups seeking recruits and the torch-bearing marchers in Charlottesville two years ago. It’s also a thinly disguised—and often not disguised—talking point from some conservative politicians and pundits, experts say.

By leaving these conspiratorial manifestos, white supremacists are trying to add to a long and growing library of terror, and get others to follow their examples.

“They’re also trying to inspire others about the urgency of the moment. In particular with the New Zealand shooter, the Poway shooter, and this guy in El Paso, you see these ideas building on each other,” Heidi Beirich, director of the Southern Poverty Law Center’s Intelligence Project, told The Daily Beast.

“There’s no question these people are feeding off each other because they’re referencing prior manifestos. In the Poway case and the El Paso case, they both referenced Christchurch.”

..

In name alone, the conspiracy theory began in 2011, with the book The Great Replacement by French author Renaud Camus. The anti-Muslim, anti-immigrant text likened the growth of non-white populations to the genocide of white people in European countries. This supposed genocide is non-existent. White supremacists use it as an excuse for violence anyway.

On August 11, 2017, white supremacists led a torchlit march on the University of Virginia campus in Charlottesville, Virginia. The marchers chanted “you will not replace us,” or sometimes “Jews will not replace us,” in a callout to the conspiracy theory.

 

Here are reports on the alt-right web notice board involved.

Camus denies any connection with any killing.

In other word he denies any link.

 

He compares himself to a liberation movement and issues this call to arms.

France Inter disagrees, calling Camus’ writing a seminal text for the the radicalised young.

Le Grand Remplacement, texte séminal pour ces jeunes radicalisés

Many people have read Renaud Camus’ le grand remplacement, “ the great replacement” . Apart from the name, whose message takes two seconds to get, the book is short. Its appeal is that it is “a conspiracy theory that claims a global elite is conspiring against the European white populations to replace them with non-European peoples.”

In this simplicity Camus stands out from the intellectualised writings of people like Guillaume Faye (1949 – 2018), a key thinker in “identitarianism” and Alain de Benoist, a founder of the far-right Nouvelle Droite. Both are parents of the ‘alt-right’. Faye talked of “La Colonisation de l’Europe”  and ” ethnomasochism” by which Europeans denigrate their history faced with this ‘invasion’. Few people would follow with ease, however, the detailed pages in his writings on “L’Archéofuturisme“, beyond this rhetoric, “We are standing face to face with the barbarians. The enemy is no longer outside but inside the City, and the ruling ideology, paralysed, is incapable of spotting him. It stammers, overcome by its own moral disarmament, and is giving up: this is the time to seize the reins. Present society is an accomplice to the evil that is devouring it.”

Benoist’, who has written on nationalism, sovereignty, Nietzsche, Gramsci, the Indo-Europeans, neo-paganism (a theme he shares with Faye), Jesus, European Identity, and a  few more subjects, can be summed up in the belief that “European “identity” needs to be defended against erasure by immigration, global trade, multinational institutions, and left-wing multiculturalism.” (They Wanted To Be A Better Class Of White Nationalists. They Claimed This Man As Their Father J.Lester Feder and Pierre Buet).

Some of these ideas have fed into the left and have helped shaped the present-day ‘red-brown’ front.

The  ‘leftist’ intellectual US journal Telos translated Benoist’s Manifesto for a European Renaissance in 1999 and had a deep interest and sympathy for Faye. Some of the first renderings into English of the nouvelle droite current  were done by this one-time radical-chic publisher which counts Alain de Benoist as a regular contributor (Archeofuturism: European Visions of the Post-Catastrophic Age (Guillaume Faye).  More recently the criticism of ‘rootless cosmopolitans’ and behalf of the ‘somewhere’ people with deep ties to place and culture, a call taken up by supporters of the red-brown front the Full Brexit, and others, parallels Faye and Benoist’s right-wing identity politics with a new identity politics of the Brexit Party and pro-Brexit left. The ‘working class’ is seen is seen as a hereditary culture under threat from ‘globalism’ and its vehicle, the European Union. ‘Uncontrolled’ immigration is a common target. (1)

Yet the far-right goes much further, and raves at a ‘genocidal’ threat.

This is Guillaume Faye on the European Union, developing themes in the same vein as Camus (2016).

European peoples are surreptitiously victims of an attempt at genocide, demographic and cultural elimination, driven by their own ethno-masochistic and xenophile elites. This is an historical first.  The French authorities are, with the Belgians, the most involved in this enterprise of soft genocide. The is both physical and cultural.

Despite an apparent anti-racist ideology, it nevertheless follows a racial and racist goal: to eliminate from Europe, progressively, and in particular from France, the native populations. Eliminate them in five ways: by encouraging settlement immigration from outside Europe; discouraging native birth rates and penalizing middle-class families; by provoking the exile of young indigenous forces by dissuasive taxation measures; by favoring, in social, economic, legal and cultural terms, populations of non-European origin in relation to indigenous peoples; by penalizing and punishing all opposition to the global immigrationist project and any hindrance to its ideology.

A project of genocide of the European peoples? – by Guillaume Faye

On Camus I cannot recommend too highly this article: which should be read in full (extracts)

How Gay Icon Renaud Camus Became the Ideologue of White Supremacy

The bizarre odyssey of the “great replacement” theorist shows that kitsch can kill. James McAuley

A pioneering gay writer in the heady 1980s. A laureate of the Académie Française, a literary circle so rarefied that its members are known as les immortels. A radical champion of art for art’s sake who withdrew to a 14th-century château to live among the paintings and the pictures that were the only sources of meaning he ever seemed to recognize. These are all descriptions that might once have captured the essence of Renaud Camus.

His trademark was fearlessness, as evinced in his 1979 autobiographical novel, Tricks, which recounts in unsparing detail a string of nonchalant homosexual encounters the narrator has in nightclub bathrooms and grimy apartments on both sides of the Atlantic. “I put saliva in my ass, kneeled on both sides of him, and brought his penis, which was not of a very considerable size, inside me without much difficulty,” we read of one such encounter. “He came the moment one of my fingers was pressed inside the crack of his ass.” That was Camus then.

These days, the author of Tricks is better known as the principal architect of le grand remplacement (the great replacement), the conspiracy theory that white, Christian Europe is being invaded and destroyed by hordes of black and brown immigrants from North and sub-Saharan Africa. Since 2012, when it appeared as the title of a book Camus self-published, the term “great replacement” has become a rallying cry of white supremacists around the world—the demonstrators who stormed through Charlottesville, Virginia, in August 2017; the man who killed 11 worshippers at the Tree of Life synagogue in Pittsburgh in October 2018; and especially Brenton Tarrant, the suspect in the New Zealand mosque attacks in March. Tarrant posted his own “The Great Replacement”—a 74-page online manifesto—before murdering 51 people.

The day after the Christchurch shooting, I called Camus out of the blue, reporting for The Washington Post. He told me then that he condemned this kind of violence but that he ultimately appreciated the attention these episodes have brought to his arguments. Does he resent “the fact that people take notice of the ethnic substitution that is in progress in my country?” he asked rhetorically. “No. To the contrary.”

..

Who, after all, reads Renaud Camus in 2019? Not the literary critics who still study Céline and Pound. Camus’s target demographic is angry white men with no discernible culture or critical faculties who shoot up mosques and synagogues because it makes them feel superior. His work provides them with some kind of half-baked justification, based on the lie of le grand remplacement, which is indeed “the epitome of all that is spurious in the life of our times.”

Consider the following excerpt from “The Great Replacement,” the manifesto published online by Brenton Tarrant. He drew particular attention to his travels in France, the details of which have yet to be confirmed. “The final push was witnessing the state of French cities and towns. For many years I had been hearing and reading of the invasion of France by non-whites, many of these rumours and stories I believed to be exaggerations, created to push a political narrative. But once I arrived in France, I found the stories not only to be true, but profoundly understated.” Where had Tarrant been reading those stories? Perhaps Camus’s seminal achievement has been to show that kitsch can kill.

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2 Responses

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  1. Ho odd then that frontpagemagazine claims to at least seen snatches of an El Paso Ecological National Socialist manifesto claiming that “our” lifestyle is destroying the environment of “our” country. The whack job carps about “thousands of tons of unnecessary plastic waste” and water “being polluted,” and even sings praise of “The Lorax”. Does this sound like Trumpistas? Granted today’s econazis prefer “environmental” purity to the breeding for innate altruism of nationalsocialist “racial” purity, but aren’t the econazis simply the “new” left? https://www.frontpagemag.com/point/274519/el-paso-shooter-wanted-kill-people-save-daniel-greenfield

    oiltranslator

    August 6, 2019 at 8:14 pm


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