Tendance Coatesy

Left Socialist Blog

“Britain should leave the EU on WTO terms” – the Story Behind the Communist Party of Britain’s Call.

with 11 comments

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Communist Party of Britain Brexit Sub-Committee.

Britain should leave the EU on March 29, liberating a future Labour government from EU Single Market rules and trading with EU and other countries on WTO terms if necessary, Britain’s Communists declared at the weekend.

At the first meeting of its new Executive Committee elected at the 55th Congress, the Communist Party said that the ‘pro-EU Tory minority regime’ and the EU Commission could not be trusted to reach any withdrawal agreement that did not serve the interests of big business and the capitalist class.

‘Locking Britain into the EU Customs Union would make any such agreement even worse’, Robert Griffiths explained, ‘because it would outlaw import regulation to protect strategic industries such as steel, while also impeding a mutually beneficial fair trade policy with developing countries’.

Britain’s Communists urged the labour movement to reject ‘anti-democratic manoeuvres’ to extend Article 50 in order to delay and possibly cancel Brexit. Instead, the CP executive called for a ‘People’s Brexit’ to leave the EU, its Single Market, Customs Union and new pro-NATO military structures so that a left-led Labour government will be free to pursue left and progressive policies that benefit the workers and the people by investing in transport, the environment, housing, productive industry and public services.

‘Britain should leave the EU on WTO terms’, Communists propose

Communist Party calls for Brexit on World Trade Organisation terms (The independent Daily Paper of the Left, the  Morning Star).

The Morning Star has  yet to track down the insider’s account of the reasons for this call, and even the highly rated Skwawkbox has not, so far, published the ‘low down’

But the Newshounds of Tendance Coatesy are hot on the story that has rocked Britain’s left.

Our investigative reporters suggest that the announcement may be a sign of these possibilities:

  • The CPB has made the barking announcement so that anything, absolutely anything, Andrew Murray and Seumas Milne suggest for  Labour’s Brexit plans,  will look reasonable.
  • The Party has decided to follow Chantal Mouffe’s Left Populist strategy of hegemonically uniting  Gammon discursive articulations, with the most advanced sections of the labour movement,  through a chain of equivalences, in a People’s Brexit.
  • The WTO, as identified by cde Aaron Bastani, is the most advanced form of capitalist accelerationism whose rules will ensure the swift coming of total luxury communism –  faster than Novara Media’s Griffin farms in Norway.
  • Roger Griffiths and his mates have never got over the 1970s Alternative Economic Strategy and its protectionist proposals.
  • The CPB actually believes this load of old cobblers.

The Central Committee of Tendance Coatesy is in permanent session debating our response.

On a serious note, it seems that the CPB is prepared to throw the Irish people to the Unionist wolves.

 

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11 Responses

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  1. The CPB’s union-subsidised mouthpiece is also coming out with this garbage:

    On Friday of last week (as Tendance Coatesy noted) the Morning Star went into full conspiratorial mode with an editorial warning:

    “The danger is clear. Every suggestion, explicit or subliminal, that exit from the EU is an
    option that can be deferred, either for now or infinitely, threatens Labour’s hard-won
    credibility with its core electorate of working people.

    “The serial undermining of Jeremy Corbyn’s pledge to respect the referendum result has
    many seats of subversion.

    “Some can be found in the shadow cabinet, even among those charged with implementing
    conference policy. Some on the back benches where unfulfilled ambition ends in speculation
    about forming a new centre party of class collaboration or reconstituting a Blairite tendency
    to the same ends.

    “There are many subterranean channels of communication between elements in Labour and
    the EU powers that be.”

    In addition to this conspiracy theory stuff, something else was finally revealed: the Morning
    Star is in favour of a no-deal Brexit:

    “One reflection of popular feeling is the rising sense that a no-deal Brexit is preferable to the
    alternatives
    “This is fed by the pervasive sense among millions of people that an elite is stealing the
    popular verdict on Brexit.”

    No mistaking the Faragist influence there. But, equally, note the dissembling cowardice: the
    unwillingness to simply state that no-deal is what the M Star favours: why not, when it’s so
    obvious?

    Could it be that the M Star, which has deliberately positioned itself as a Corbyn fanzine, now
    finds itself in opposition to the one clear policy that Corbyn has on Brexit: opposing no deal?

    Jim Denham

    January 30, 2019 at 3:31 pm

  2. An excellent article, “Morning Star goes for “no deal”
    Jim Denham.

    “Conspiracy theories are on the rise in politics these days. Traditionally conspiracism has tended to be associated with the right but – increasingly in the UK – it’s coming to characterise sections of the left.

    Conspiracists see the world in terms of shadowy groups of individuals controlling finance, the media and institutions. Insofar as they oppose capitalism, it’s not through a critique of basic social relations: no, it’s because sinister forces (often characterised as finance capital or just “the bankers”) are in control. This kind of thinking has nothing to do with Marxism even when it uses some Marxian terminology.

    A favourite word of the conspiracists is “elite”. The whole Brexit row is apparently about “elites” (sometimes “oligarchs” or even “plutocrats”) against “the people”(or “working people” or “the voters”). That terminology originated not from the left from that curious mixture of former leftists and outright 1920s fascists, Gaetano Mosca, Vilfredo Pareto, and Robert Michels. To put it simply, they thought elites inevitable and saw the fundamental clash in society not as between classes but between the elite and the people.

    So it is strange and disturbing to find the Morning Star, a publication under the control of the ostensibly Marxist Communist Party of Britain, increasingly using such language, and the conspiratorial approach that goes with it, in its coverage of Brexit.

    On Friday 25 January the Morning Star went into full conspiratorial mode with an editorial warning: “The danger is clear. Every suggestion, explicit or subliminal, that exit from the EU is an option that can be deferred, either for now or infinitely, threatens Labour’s hard-won credibility with its core electorate of working people.

    “The serial undermining of Jeremy Corbyn’s pledge to respect the referendum result has many seats of subversion.

    “Some can be found in the shadow cabinet, even among those charged with implementing conference policy. Some on the back benches where unfulfilled ambition ends in speculation about forming a new centre party of class collaboration or reconstituting a Blairite tendency to the same ends.

    “There are many subterranean channels of communication between elements in Labour and the EU powers that be.”

    In addition to this conspiracy theory stuff, something else was finally revealed: the Morning Star is in favour of a no deal Brexit: “One reflection of popular feeling is the rising sense that a no deal Brexit is preferable to the alternatives.

    “This is fed by the pervasive sense among millions of people that an elite is stealing the popular verdict on Brexit.

    No mistaking the Faragist influence there. But, equally, note the dissembling cowardice: the unwillingness to simply state that no deal is what the Morning Star favours: why not, when it’s so obvious? Could it be that the Morning Star, which has deliberately positioned itself as a Corbyn fanzine, now finds itself in opposition to the one clear policy that Corbyn has on Brexit: opposing no deal?

    https://www.workersliberty.org/story/2019-01-30/morning-star-goes-no-deal

    Andrew Coates

    January 30, 2019 at 5:06 pm

  3. I should have (and meant to) give you an acknowledgement, Andrew, for the stuff about Gaetano Mosca, Vilfredo Pareto, and Robert Michels.

    Jim Denham

    January 30, 2019 at 5:27 pm

  4. The stuff about ‘elites and the rest is common knowledge Jim, or was, something that comes up in a range of things, politics, sociology and the rest. As you immediately saw.

    I just got annoyed that nobody seems to mention it.

    The more of us who do mention it, the better.

    Perhaps – being a kindly chap, they forget about it because only this book is one that most people – well me – think is worth reading again:

    Andrew Coates

    January 30, 2019 at 5:45 pm

  5. I was looking forward to reading what today’s Morning Star would have to say about the HoC Brexit votes on 29th, as yesterday’s edition had clearly gone to press before the results were known. Sadly, today’s M Star says precisely … nothing (apart from a short news item about Corbyn challenging May over the backstop). Could it be that they simply can’t work out whether or not to applaud MPs “standing up to” Brussels (the M Star line) and the step towards no-deal (also the M Star line)?

    Jim Denham

    January 31, 2019 at 9:41 am

  6. Clearly (inspired by a famous/notorious Red Weekly headline from the 1970s) the headline should have been:

    Tories reunite on Brexit ! Big chance for the Left!

    nollaigoj

    January 31, 2019 at 10:21 am

  7. Spot-on nollaigoj !

    Jim Denham

    January 31, 2019 at 11:16 am

  8. Almost more interesting than what Corbyn and the PM said to each other this afternoon was who accompanied the Labour leader to the meeting.

    He was joined by his chief of staff Karie Murphy and his director of strategy Seumas Milne (as well as the chief whip Nick Brown) but not by his Brexit secretary Keir Starmer.

    Why does that matter?

    In the battle over whether Labour should ever back a Brexit referendum or People’s Vote, Murphy and Milne are implacably opposed, and Starmer is battling to keep that option alive.

    So it matters that in choosing to explain what kind of Brexit deal Labour would support, Corbyn was accompanied by the two influential aides who are convinced that Labour should deliver Brexit and not ask the views of the people again.

    This was a signal, his colleagues say, of Corbyn’s own clear preference to avoid another referendum.

    What also matters is that Corbyn felt – I am told – that the meeting was more than a going through the motions, that the Prime Minister genuinely listened and probed, as he and his colleagues outlined their plan for membership of the customs union, partial membership of the EU’s single market, and further protections for workers’ rights.

    In terms of the technical nitty gritty, Corbyn and team said they wanted dynamic alignment with the EU on employment regulations – as opposed to the standstill written into the so-called backstop – and non-regression or a standstill on state aid rules.

    This seems to me all of a piece with a pincer movement by Milne and Murphy with Len McCluskey, general secretary of the Unite union, to try to engineer a Brexit deal before 29 March that Labour could officially fall in behind – since McCluskey too, who is close to Corbyn, is set against a referendum.

    McCluskey, for example, on Monday met the business secretary Greg Clark – who as it happens is on my show tonight – to discuss legislation to protect and extend workers’ right after Brexit.

    And tomorrow more junior officials from Unite, the TUC, the GMB and Unison will meet Sarah Healey, the director of economic and domestic affairs at the Cabinet Office and Chris Thompson from the business department to take the agenda forward on what the government can do to secure trade union support for Brexit.

    For what it’s worth, my understanding is that Corbyn sees the failure to secure a majority yesterday of the Cooper and Grieve motions – and Labour’s own one, which explicitly mentions the possibility of a referendum – as proof that MPs really don’t want a People’s Vote.

    Even more striking is that those close to Labour’s leader tell me they can indeed envisage a moment in the coming weeks when it will be official Labour policy to vote for a Brexit plan.

    Those at the top of Labour, and in the grassroots, who want a referendum should fear they are being properly outmanoeuvred.

    Robert Preston:

    https://www.facebook.com/pestonitv/

    Andrew Coates

    January 31, 2019 at 12:46 pm

  9. I voted “Remain”.
    I consider myself to be a person on the left and have contempt for Lexiteers.
    However, I do think that the referendum result imposes a certain moral imperative.
    The population of the UK have a democratic obligation therefore to work within the framework of the result.
    Brexit means Brexit is vapid, covering a multitude of sins.
    One is therefore entitled to advocate the softest possible Brexit including free movement of people, goods and services within the island of Ireland.
    On the other hand the invoking of Article 50 was a decision of the UK Parliament and MPs are therefore entitled to revoke Article 50 (which is not in theory against the decision of the referendum – there was no date in the referendum ballot paper!) or to ask the other EU states for a postponement of the March 29th date.

    nollaigoj

    January 31, 2019 at 6:34 pm

  10. The Communist Party of Britain Marxist-Leninist (CPBML) also opposes your europhile ramblings.

    troubadour2

    February 18, 2019 at 1:16 am


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