Tendance Coatesy

Left Socialist Blog

Labour’s Policies on Social Security and Workers’ Rights: Pillars of a Sound Manifesto.

with 3 comments

Image result for labour manifesto 2017

 

Many people have commented, and will comment, and, who on earth  knows? will comment defavourably  on Labour’s policies .

Two areas stick out to me on this very sound Manifesto (full text here).

Both because they affect our people and because they are just.

Poverty in Britain is rising due to the Conservatives’ attempts to balance the books on the backs of the poorest. They have slashed social security over the last seven years, leaving more people in poverty, subject to a punitive sanctions regime, and reliant on food banks.

Labour will act immediately to end the worst excesses of the Conservative government’s changes. We will:

  • Scrap the punitive sanctions regime
  • Scrap the Bedroom Tax
  • Reinstate Housing Benefit for under-21s
  • Scrap cuts to Bereavement Support Payment.
  • The cuts to work allowances in Universal Credit (UC), and the decision to limit tax credit and UC payments to the first two children in a family, are an attack on low-income families and will increase child poverty. Labour will reform and redesign UC, ending six-week delays in payment and the ‘rape clause’.

With nearly four million children currently living in poverty, the majority in working families, we will commit to tackle child poverty with a new Child Poverty Strategy.

The Tories have completely failed on their promise of making work pay and on tackling the barriers to work faced by people with disabilities.

Labour supports a social model of disability. People may have a condition or an impairment but they are disabled by society. We need to remove the barriers in society that restrict opportunities.

A FAIR DEAL AT WORK

Work should provide people with security and fulfilment. But for too many people work is insecure and does not make ends meet.

The Conservatives boast about the recovery of employment, but our labour market is failing. Real-terms pay is still lower than before the crash, and jobs are increasingly low skilled and insecure.

A Labour government will invest in enforcement through a new Ministry of Labour, and empower workers and their trade unions – because we are stronger when we stand together.

So we will review the rules on union recognition so that more workers have the security of a union.

RIGHTS AT WORK

The next Labour government will bring in a 20-point plan for security and equality at work:

Give all workers equal rights from day one, whether part-time or full-time, temporary or permanent – so that working conditions are not driven down.
Ban zero hours contracts – so that every worker gets a guaranteed number of hours each week.
Legislate to ensure that any employer wishing to recruit labour from abroad does not undercut workers at home – because it causes divisions when one workforce is used against another.
Repeal the Trade Union Act and roll out sectoral collective bargaining – because the most effective way to maintain good rights at work is collectively through a union.
Guarantee trade unions a right to access workplaces – so that unions can speak to members and potential members.
Propose four new public holidays – bringing our country together to mark our four national patron saints’ days. These will be additional to statutory holiday entitlement so that workers in Britain get the same proper breaks as in other countries.
Raise the Minimum Wage to the level of the Living Wage (expected to be at least £10 per hour by 2020) – for all workers aged 18 or over, so that work pays.
End the Public Sector Pay Cap – because public sector workers deserve a pay rise after years of falling wages.

 

 

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Written by Andrew Coates

May 16, 2017 at 1:23 pm

3 Responses

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  1. One thing that strikes me as strange is the pledge to make colleges tuition free while claiming they don’t have the money to reverse benefit freezes: http://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/politics/general-election-20107-latest-labour-manifesto-benefits-freeze-cap-jeremy-corbyn-a7739471.html

    Both cost £11 billion so in an either/or choice it seems like helping people in poverty should take precedence over giving students a freebie.

    @pplswar

    May 16, 2017 at 10:03 pm

  2. The debate on tuition fees always seems to miss an important point: students who pay fees are ‘customers’ purchasing a qualification. This leads to grade inflation and a fear of failing any student, no matter how lazy or incompetent. In humanities degrees, this does not matter too much, but in professional courses its effect can be very corrupting and potentially dangerous. Abolishing tuition fees for students, making local authorities or in some cases employers the ‘customers’, is the only reliable guarantee of maintaining standards and qualifications which bear some relationship to competence.

    Francis

    May 17, 2017 at 3:56 pm

  3. I could not agree more Francis.

    Apparently getting a Desmond these days ( 2.2) is considered a failure…

    Not that I have that grade myself but I can’t recall anybody who got that in the 1970s and 1980s being classed as failures.

    Andrew Coates

    May 18, 2017 at 12:15 pm


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