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“Hard Edged Secularism” in UK to Blame for Support for Islamic State, Says Top Tory.

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Crabb: Standing up to Hard-Edged Secularists. 

The Guardian reports.

A Tory cabinet minister has said that Britain’s increasingly secular society risks “pushing more young Muslims into the arms of Isis”.

Stephen Crabb, the Welsh secretary, used a speech to claim that a “hard-edged” secularism in Britain was partly to blame for “aiding and abetting” extremism, as mainstream religion is marginalised in public life.

Crabb is a committed Christian who voted against gay marriage and is one of at least two prominent members of the Conservative Christian Fellowship in the cabinet, alongside the education secretary, Nicky Morgan.

He made the intervention on Tuesday, the day after the commission on religion and belief in British public life proposed that schools should no longer face a legal requirement to provide daily acts of worship of a Christian character. It also suggested the teaching of religious belief should be overhauled to make it more relevant in a diverse and increasingly secular country.

Although extremism is not part of his usual brief, Crabb spoke about the issue as he gave the annual Wilberforce address for the Conservative Christian Fellowship.

Apparently religious liberty is menaced.

The minister, who has been tipped as a possible outside candidate for the next Tory leadership race, said he thought freedom of religion was now under threat, citing the case of the advertising company that refused a Church of England cinema commercial promoting the Lord’s Prayer.

In the speech, he claimed the current mood meant “faith gets squeezed further into the margins of public life and religion becomes delegitimised through suspicion, fear or ridicule”. This could have implications for the fight against Islamic extremism, Crabb suggested.

“The answer to the seduction of Isil [Isis] is not a greater dose of secularism that delegitimises their faith in the public space,” he said. “I believe the marginalisation of religion in our national life risks pushing more young Muslims into the arms of Isil.”

On the Spectator Blog  comments,

He also admitted finding it easier not to talk about his own faith at all as a politician, and worrying that ‘I doubt whether we will ever see again a British Prime Minister who can talk openly about the times when they might pray to God’. He said:

‘So here we are in 2015, in an age when it is easier for a politician to admit to smoking weed or watching porn, than it is to admit that they might take prayer seriously in their daily life.’

She continues,

Crabb pointed to the open ridicule that politicians such as Tim Farron and Tony Blair invited for saying that they prayed. He also said the decision by major cinema chains to refuse to screen a Church of England advert about the Lord’s Prayer was ‘an act of enormous ignorance and intolerance’.

Crabb’s call has already had a wide echo in progressive circles.

Reports indicate that Goldsmiths College plans to offer a new MA on the intersecting social identities and related systems of secularist oppression, domination or discrimination and marginalisation of faith communities, provisionally entitled Interfaithality.

It is said that Matt Carr, an expert on Jihadism and the Spanish International Brigades (StWC) will be one of the course tutors.

One Response

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  1. Have just looked Stephen Crabb up on Wikipedia. Interesting, and it has almost certainly helped him and would help him no end if he ever did go for the leadership, that his background is antithetical to a lot of current leading figures in his party – single mum, council estate, comprehensive school (and he did have the good fortune to attend a leading university before tuition fees came in) – but a lot of the time, and especially in the Thatcher years, the Tories who have worked their way up tend to be the nastiest ones.

    I don’t *entirely* disagree with a variation of his views, but the most important bit of that statement is “a variation”. I think a moderate social role for religion *can* potentially detract from the status of more extreme forms – I’m not as militant on that front as you are. I just don’t trust his party to oversee such circumstances, and I think extreme Islamists also thrive on social exclusion and marginalisation which I don’t trust his party to reverse or challenge at all (quite the opposite in fact).

    februarycallendar

    December 9, 2015 at 6:58 pm


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